WHO IS RAILA ODINGA?


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    Written by: Meshack Masibo

    Raila Amolo Odinga was born in January 7, 1945 in Maseno in Nyanza Province. Odinga was the son of Jaramogi Oginga Odinga , the first vice president of independent Kenya. After earning a master’s degree in mechanical engineering in East Germany in 1970, Odinga returned to Kenya to become a lecturer at the University of Nairobi. During his time at the university, Odinga also engaged in engineering-related business ventures, including one that would later become East African Spectre, Ltd. In the 1970s and ’80s Odinga was politically active and supported government reforms in Kenya. In 1982 he was accused of plotting against the then president Daniel arap Moi and was imprisoned without trial for six years. After Odinga’s release, he was twice arrested for campaigning against one-party rule, and in 1991 he sought refuge in Norway . He returned to Kenya in 1992, however, and was elected a member of the National Assembly that year under the banner of the Forum for the Restoration of Democracy–Kenya (FORD–K), the party led by his father. After his father’s death in 1994, Odinga became embroiled in a leadership struggle within the party and in 1996 left FORD–K and joined the National Development Party (NDP).

    In 1997 Odinga stood unsuccessfully as the NDP’s candidate for election as president of Kenya but was able to retain his seat in the National Assembly. He and the NDP thereafter gave their support to Moi and the ruling Kikuyu -dominated Kenya African National Union (KANU). Odinga joined Moi’s cabinet as energy minister in 2001, and the NDP was absorbed into the ruling party the following year, with Odinga becoming secretary-general of KANU. Odinga’s hope of succeeding Moi as KANU’s candidate for the presidency in the 2002 elections was shattered when Moi called upon the party to support Uhuru Kenyatta, son of former president Jomo Kenyatta. Several KANU members, including Odinga, formed the Rainbow Alliance within the party in protest of the choice, and they instead advocated for a vote among KANU members to determine the party’s presidential candidate. Their pleas went unheeded, and KANU officially named Kenyatta as its candidate a few months later; in response, Odinga and the Rainbow Alliance left KANU and formed the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP).

    The LDP soon joined with a coalition of several parties, the National Alliance of Kenya (NAK), to form the National Rainbow Coalition (NARC) under the leadership of former vice president Mwai Kibaki , himself a Kikuyu. Although terms of agreement between the LDP and NAK were not completely revealed to the public, the two parties reportedly promised to equitably share cabinet posts and power—including naming Odinga to the new, strong prime minister post that would be created—if Kibaki were elected president. NARC’s efforts to challenge KANU were successful, and Kibaki was elected president in December 2002, the first non-KANU president in independent Kenya’s history. NARC candidates (including Odinga) won more than half of the seats in the National Assembly.

    As one of the NARC leaders, Odinga had played a significant role in securing the election of Kibaki, campaigning relentlessly on his behalf after the presidential candidate was seriously injured in a car accident in the month leading up to the polls. After his election, Kibaki appointed Odinga as minister of roads, public works, and housing, but the LDP soon accused Kibaki of reneging on the preelection agreement between the LDP and NAK that promised to share cabinet posts and power more equitably between the two parties. Tensions between the two NARC factions further increased over several issues discussed at the country’s constitutional review conference in the spring of 2003, including the proposal to create a strong prime minister position, which Kibaki and his supporters now backtracked from. Eventually a draft constitution supported by Kibaki that provided for a weak prime minister and a strong president was presented to the public in a referendum vote in November 2005. It was not approved, however, as Odinga successfully led a campaign against it. Soon after, Kibaki dismissed his entire cabinet and reconstituted it the next month, without Odinga or many of the former cabinet members who supported Odinga.

    Problems between the LDP and NAK continued, leading to the collapse of the NARC coalition in 2006. Meanwhile, Odinga had already formed a new coalition, the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM). In the months prior to the 2007 presidential and legislative elections, Kibaki formed his own coalition, the Party of National Unity (PNU). During the campaign, Odinga sought to dispel the perceived grievances of some western Kenyan ethnic groups by denouncing corruption in high places and by campaigning for a fairer distribution of land and the devolvement of power to largely single-ethnic district councils.

    The ODM won a resounding parliamentary majority in the December 2007 legislative election. The provisional results of the presidential election indicated that Odinga would be victorious as well. However, when the final election results were released after a delay, Kibaki was declared the winner by a narrow margin. Odinga immediately disputed the outcome, and international observers questioned the validity of the final results. Widespread protests ensued throughout the country and degenerated into horrific acts of violence involving some of Kenya’s many ethnic groups, most notable of which were the Kikuyu and the Luo. More than 1,000 people were killed and more than 600,000 were displaced in the election’s violent aftermath.

    In February 2008 former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan and Jakaya Kikwete, president of Tanzania and chairman of the African Union , brokered an agreement between Kibaki and Odinga for the PNU and the ODM to form a coalition government . This led to Odinga’s being sworn in on April 17, 2008, to the newly created post of prime minister under Kibaki’s presidency and with a power-sharing cabinet.

    In the run-up to the 2013 elections, Odinga’s ODM formed the Coalition for Reforms and Democracy (CORD) alliance with Kenyan Vice Presiident Stephen Kalonzo Musyoka’s Wiper Democratic Movement and other parties. Under the CORD banner, Odinga and Musyoka campaigned for the posts of president and vice president, respectively. Among the eight presidential candidates, Odinga and Kenyatta—this time representing the Jubilee Coalition—were front-runners going into the March 4 election, which transpired with relative calm. After a delay in the release of the final results, due to problems with the vote-tallying process, electoral officials announced that Odinga received 43.31 percent of the vote, placing second to Kenyatta, who was declared the winner with 50.07 percent of the vote—just enough to avoid a second round of voting. Odinga did not at first concede. Citing what he maintained were many irregularities with the election, he filed a challenge to the results with the Supreme Court but promised to respect the court’s decision. The court ultimately upheld the election results, and Odinga conceded.

    Odinga remained politically active. In the prelude to the 2017 elections, Odinga’s ODM party and the other parties that were previously part of the CORD coalition allied with more parties to form the National Super Alliance (NASA). The new alliance backed Odinga for president and Musyoka for deputy president to stand in the upcoming elections. The elections were held on August 8, 2017, and were generally peaceful. Before the results were announced, however, Odinga and other NASA members alleged that electoral irregularities had taken place and that the server of the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) had been hacked. NASA requested that the presidential election be nullified on the basis that it was compromised.  The Supreme Court’s decision, announced on September 1, agreed with Odinga and NASA that irregularities had marred the presidential election.

    A new election, originally scheduled for October 17 by the IEBC, was later slated for October 26 to allow the commission more time to prepare for it. The rescheduling came on the heels of the September 20 release of the Supreme Court’s detailed ruling on why it had annulled the results of the August 8 election. The ruling faulted the actions of the IEBC and cited many problems with the vote tallying and transmission process. On the basis of NASA’s version of the election results, Odinga was sworn in as the “people’s president” of Kenya on January 30, 2018, at a rally attended by thousands of NASA supporters.

    In March this year, in a moved that sent waves in the political space Reila Odinga entered  into a handshake agreement with arch rival President Uhuru Kenyatta which is aimed at building bridges and uniting the country as one. Many are hopeful and await to see the fruits of the handshake deal brokered by close aides of the two leaders.

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